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Safeguarding National Unity, Opposing National Separatism

  • Shiyuan Hao
Chapter
Part of the China Academic Library book series (CHINALIBR)

Abstract

China has suffered in recent history from continuous aggression by imperialist powers as well as the erosion of its sovereignty during a century of humiliation that included occupation, dismemberment and division. Since the First Opium War in 1840, Britain, France, Germany, the United States, Italy, the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Russian Empire, the Netherlands, Spain, Portugal and Japan have all carried out acts of aggression against China by land or by sea, which can be described as unique even among continents and countries that have suffered from Western imperialism and colonialism in recent times. As a result, the historical legacy of nationality issues left by imperialism is particularly onerous.

Keywords

Democratic Progressive Party Chinese Nation Minority Nationality Peaceful Development Taiwan Issue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Foreign Language Teaching and Research Publishing Co., Ltd and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shiyuan Hao
    • 1
  1. 1.Chinese Academy of Social SciencesBeijingChina

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