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Theoretical Study of Bare Soil Parameters’ Effects on GPS Multipath Observables

  • Xuerui WuEmail author
  • Shuanggen Jin
  • Ye Li
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 340)

Abstract

In the past two decades, GNSS-R has emerged as a new and attractive remote sensing technique. The geodetic/geophysical GPS receivers are out-of commercial and their recorded multipath observables have potentials for geophysical parameters detections, e.g. soil moisture, vegetation growth and snow depth. Based on the developed forward GPS multipath model, effects of bare soil parameters on GPS multipath observations are evaluated here. Wave synthesis technique is employed to get the coherent scattering coefficients at VV, HH, RR and LR polarizations, while the bare soil dielectric constant is calculated by a microwave dielectric soil-water mixing model. Effects of three-frequencies GPS modulations (L1 band, L2 band and L5 band) are evaluated: although there are apparent differences for GPS multipath observables, it is not the effects of bare soil but the direct broadcasting signals since soil scattering properties at these frequencies (L band) are the same. Soil texture and surface roughness have almost no effects on GPS observables. As the soil temperature changes from SubZero to above zero, the amplitudes of SNR, phase and code pseudorange increased. Soil moisture also affects GPS observables, as moisture content increases, the amplitudes of GPS observables increase.

Keywords

GPS-multipath reflectometry Triple-frequency Soil texture Surface roughness Soil moisture Frozen/thawn soil 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is supported by supported by the Open Research Fund of The Academy of Satellite Application under grant NO.2014_CXJJ-DH_05. The Open Research Fund of The Academy of Satellite Application under grant NO.2014_CXJJ-DH_05.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Shanghai Astronomical ObservatoryChinese Academy of SciencesShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Space Star Technology CO., LtdBeijingChina

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