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Problem-Solving Methods

  • Jürg Kuster
  • Eugen Huber
  • Robert Lippmann
  • Alphons Schmid
  • Emil Schneider
  • Urs Witschi
  • Roger Wüst
Chapter
Part of the Management for Professionals book series (MANAGPROF)

Abstract

The problem-solving process benefits from a systematic, structured approach, rather than knee-jerk reactions. It can sometimes be good to immediately embark on an “obvious” solution without actually fully exploring the current situation, or even without stopping to think about the goals and the possible range of solutions. This is a very common situation in practice, and is known as “jumping to a solution”. But for projects that involve new territory, a different approach is more worthwhile (Fig. 26.1).

Keywords

Project Manager Optimisation Criterion Project Team Solution Variant Project Goal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Reference

  1. Daenzer, W. F. (Hrsg.). (2002). Systems engineering. Zürich: Verlag Industrielle Organisation. ISBN 3-85743-998-X.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jürg Kuster
    • 1
  • Eugen Huber
    • 2
  • Robert Lippmann
    • 3
  • Alphons Schmid
    • 4
  • Emil Schneider
    • 5
  • Urs Witschi
    • 6
  • Roger Wüst
    • 7
  1. 1.WinterthurSwitzerland
  2. 2.SargansSwitzerland
  3. 3.MännedorfSwitzerland
  4. 4.WinkelSwitzerland
  5. 5.WarthSwitzerland
  6. 6.EnnetbadenSwitzerland
  7. 7.DänikonSwitzerland

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