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RoboCup Logistics League Sponsored by Festo: A Competitive Factory Automation Testbed

  • Tim Niemueller
  • Daniel Ewert
  • Sebastian Reuter
  • Alexander Ferrein
  • Sabina Jeschke
  • Gerhard Lakemeyer
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8371)

Abstract

A new trend in automation is to deploy so-called cyber-physical systems (CPS) which combine computation with physical processes. The novel RoboCup Logistics League Sponsored by Festo (LLSF) aims at such CPS logistic scenarios in an automation setting. A team of robots has to produce products from a number of semi-finished products which they have to machine during the game. Different production plans are possible and the robots need to recycle scrap byproducts. This way, the LLSF is a very interesting league offering a number of challenging research questions for planning, coordination, or communication in an application-driven scenario. In this paper, we outline the objectives of the LLSF and present steps for developing the league further towards a benchmark for logistics scenarios for CPS. As a major milestone we present the new automated referee system which helps in governing the game play as well as keeping track of the scored points in a very complex factory scenario.

Keywords

Mobile Robot Machine Type Enterprise Resource Planning System Manufacture Execution System Machine Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tim Niemueller
    • 1
  • Daniel Ewert
    • 2
  • Sebastian Reuter
    • 2
  • Alexander Ferrein
    • 3
  • Sabina Jeschke
    • 2
  • Gerhard Lakemeyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Knowledge-based Systems GroupRWTH Aachen UniversityGermany
  2. 2.Institute Cluster IMA/ZLW & IfURWTH Aachen UniversityGermany
  3. 3.Electrical Engineering DepartmentAachen Univ. of Appl. Sc.Germany

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