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Project Organization and Roles

  • Kurt Sandkuhl
  • Janis Stirna
  • Anne Persson
  • Matthias Wißotzki
Chapter
Part of the The Enterprise Engineering Series book series (TEES)

Abstract

The ability to carry out Enterprise Modeling in practice requires not only the basic methodological knowledge covered in Chaps.  7 and  8, but also suitable project organization in the enterprise in question. This chapter describes how a 4EM project should be set up in practice, including both the roles involved in the project team and the organizational prerequisites in the enterprise in question. It also illustrates typical project phases and discusses options for implementing the participatory approach. The principles and recommendations presented here apply to other EM approaches that share the same overlying philosophy of multi-perspective and participatory modeling.

Keywords

Business Process Modeling Group Modeling Activity Domain Expert Modeling Project 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kurt Sandkuhl
    • 1
  • Janis Stirna
    • 2
  • Anne Persson
    • 3
  • Matthias Wißotzki
    • 1
  1. 1.University of RostockRostockGermany
  2. 2.Stockholm UniversityStockholmSweden
  3. 3.University of SkövdeSkövdeSweden

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