Advertisement

Imaging Interferometry — Experience from COAST and Implications for the VLTI

  • Chris Haniff
  • David Buscher
Conference paper
Part of the ESO Astrophysics Symposia book series (ESO)

Abstract

The ability to deliver model-independent imaging of complex astrophysical sources is a critical capability required for the VLTI. In this paper we investigate how this goal can best be realised by reviewing the lessons that have been learnt through operating the world’s first optical/IR imaging interferometer, the Cambridge Optical Aperture Synthesis Telescope (COAST). We discuss the key functional requirements established through seven years of astronomical observations with COAST, and outline the strategy needed to ensure the scientific success of imaging with the VLTI in the face of competing facilities such as the Keck, NPOI, and CHARA arrays.

Keywords

Angular Resolution Array Element Generation Array High Angular Resolution Angular Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    J.T. Armstrong, D. Mozurkewich et al.: Astrophys. J. 496, 550 (1998)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    C.A. Haniff, J.E. Baldwin et al.: Proc. S.P.I.E. 4006, 627 (2000)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    J.E. Baldwin: ‘COAST: the current status’. In: High-Resolution Imaging by Inter-ferometry II, ESO Conference at Garching bei München, Germany, October 15-October 18, 1991, ed. by J.M. Beckers, F. Merkle (European Southern Observatory, Garching bei München 1992) pp. 747–752Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J.E. Baldwin, M.G. Beckett et al.: Astron. Astrophys. 306, L13 (1996)ADSGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    D. Burns, J.E. Baldwin et al.: Mon. Not. R. Astr. Soc. 297, 462 (1998)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    J.S. Young, J.E. Baldwin et al.: Mon. Not. R. Astr. Soc. 318, 381 (2000)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    D. Burns, J.E. Baldwin et al.: Mon. Not. R. Astr. Soc. 290, L11 (1997)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    A. Quirrenbach, D. Mozurkewich et al.: Astron. Astrophys. 312, 160 (1996)ADSGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    A.R. Hajian, J.T. Armstrong et al.: Astrophys. J. 496, 484 (1998)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    A.B. Peck, G.B. Taylor: Astrophys. J. 534, 90 (2000)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    C. Xu, S.A. Baum et al.: Astron. J. 120, 2950 (2000)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    B.F. Lane, M.J. Kuchner et al.: Nature 407, 485 (2000)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    D.F. Buscher: Mon. Not. R. Astr. Soc. 235, 1203 (1988)ADSGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    J.T. Armstrong, D. Mozurkewich et al.: Proc. S.P.I.E. 3350, 461 (1998)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    A. Glindemann: Priv. corn., (2001)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    H.A. McAlister, W.G. Bagnuolo et al.: Proc. S.P.I.E. 3350, 947 (1998)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris Haniff
    • 1
  • David Buscher
    • 1
  1. 1.Cavendish LaboratoryAstrophysics GroupCambridgeUK

Personalised recommendations