Conducting Clinical Conferences

  • Dorothy W. Smith

Abstract

Clinical conferences are responding slowly and unevenly to changes in teachers’ knowledge, skills, and convictions. In the past, the clinical conference frequently consisted of discussion of a patient’s symptoms, diagnostic tests, treatment, and prognosis, with relatively little emphasis upon his nursing requirements. The leader might be the instructor, or a student; sometimes several students were asked to present material. One, for instance, might review the anatomy and physiology and the pathologic changes, another might present a summary of the patient’s diagnostic tests, and contrast the results of these tests with normal values, and a third might discuss nursing care. More emphasis was usually placed upon medical aspects than upon nursing, and considerable time was spent in reviewing and reinforcing such factual knowledge as medical terminology.

Keywords

Arthritis Sponge Defend Uremia Demerol 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Suggested Reading

  1. Lister, Doris W. “The Clinical Conference.” Nursing Forum, 5:84,No. 3, 1966.Google Scholar
  2. Newman, Margaret A. “Identifying and Meeting Patients’ Needs in Short-Span Nurse-Patient Relationships,” Nursing Forum, 5:76,No. 1, 1966.Google Scholar
  3. Palmer, Mary Ellen. “Nursing Care Study Brought up to Date,” Nursing Outlook, 12:36, June, 1964.Google Scholar
  4. Shetland, Margaret L. “Teaching and Learning in Nursing,” American Journal of Nursing, 65:112,September, 1965.Google Scholar
  5. Zelko, M. P. Successful Conference and Discussion Technique. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1964.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dorothy W. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical-Surgical NursingRutgers, the State University of New JerseyRoselle ParkUSA

Personalised recommendations