Newer Perspectives in Learning-Memory

  • Jack Botwinick

Abstract

In the two previous chapters on learning and memory, a distinction was made among the processes of encoding, storage, and retrieval. There is now a deemphasis on this distinction and also a deemphasis on multistore models of memory, just described. A newer theory—depth of processing—places almost all of the emphasis on encoding. The idea is that the duration of memory depends mainly, if not totally, on the quality and extent of information processing. If information is very well learned (deeply processed), it will be long remembered. Conversely, if it is poorly learned (shallowly processed), it will soon be forgotten.

Keywords

Stim Estima Rote Prose 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

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  • Jack Botwinick

There are no affiliations available

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