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The Role of Enzyme Inactivation in the Regulation of Glutamine Synthesis in Yeast: in vivo Studies Using 15NH3

  • A. P. Sims
  • A. R. Ferguson

Abstract

Studies using isotopically-labelled ammonia have shown that in the yeast, Candida utilis, almost all the ammonia assimilated enters into two compounds, glutamate and glutamine (Figure 1).

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References

  1. Ferguson, A.R. and Sims, A. P. (1971). In vivo inactivation of glutamine synthetase and Nad-specific glutamate dehydrogenase: its role in the regulation of glutamine synthesis in yeasts. Journal of General Microbiology (in press).Google Scholar
  2. Hubbard, J.S. and Stadtman, E.R. (1967). Regulation of glutamine synthetase. II. Patterns of feedback inhibition in microorganisms. Journal of Bacteriology 93, 1045–1055.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. Sims, A. P. and Folkes, B. F. (1964). A kinetic study of the assimilation of (15N)-ammonia and the synthesis of amino acids in an exponentially growing culture of Candida utilis. Proceedings of the Royal Society, B 159, 479–502.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Sims, A. P., Folkes, B.F. and Bussey, A.H. (1968). Mechanisms involved in the regulation of nitrogen assimilation in microorganisms and plants. In Recent Aspects of Nitrogen Metabolism in Plants (First Long Ashton Symposium, 1967) pp 91–114. Edited by E.J. Hewitt and C.V. Cutting. London and New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. P. Sims
    • 1
  • A. R. Ferguson
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of East AngliaNorwichEngland

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