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Human Rights

  • Rainer Hofmann
  • Juliane Kokott
  • Karin Oellers-Frahm
  • Stefan Oeter
  • Andreas Zimmermann

Abstract

The Court also notes that Nicaragua is accused by the 1985 finding of the United States Congress of violating human rights. This particular point requires to be studied independently of the question of the existence of a “legal commitment” by Nicaragua towards the Organization of American States to respect these rights; the absence of such a commitment would not mean that Nicaragua could with impunity violate human rights. However, where human rights are protected by international conventions, that protection takes the form of such arrangements for monitoring or ensuring respect for human rights as are provided for in the conventions themselves. The political pledge by Nicaragua was made in the context of the Organization of American States, the organs of which were consequently entitled to monitor its observance. The Court has noted above (paragraph 168) that the Nicaraguan Government has since 1979 ratified a number of international instruments on human rights, and one of these was the American Convention on Human Rights (the Pact of San José, Costa Rica). The mechanisms provided for therein have functioned. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights in fact took action and compiled two reports (OEA/Ser.L/V/11.53 and 62) following visits by the Commission to Nicaragua at the Government’s invitation. Consequently, the Organization was in a position, if it so wished, to take a decision on the basis of these reports.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rainer Hofmann
  • Juliane Kokott
  • Karin Oellers-Frahm
  • Stefan Oeter
  • Andreas Zimmermann

There are no affiliations available

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