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Self-Determination

  • Rainer Hofmann
  • Juliane Kokott
  • Karin Oellers-Frahm
  • Stefan Oeter
  • Andreas Zimmermann

Abstract

However, it may be wondered how the time-hallowed principle has been able to withstand the new approaches to international law as expressed in Africa, where the successive attainment of independence and the emergence of new States have been accompanied by a certain questioning of traditional international law. At first sight this principle conflicts outright with another one, the right of peoples to self-determination. In fact, however, the maintenance of the territorial status quo in Africa is often seen as the wisest course, to preserve what has been achieved by peoples who have struggled for their independence, and to avoid a disruption which would deprive the continent of the gains achieved by much sacrifice. The essential requirement of stability in order to survive, to develop and gradually to consolidate their independence in all fields, has induced African States judiciously to consent to the respecting of colonial frontiers, and to take account of it in the interpretation of the principle of selfdetermination of peoples.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rainer Hofmann
  • Juliane Kokott
  • Karin Oellers-Frahm
  • Stefan Oeter
  • Andreas Zimmermann

There are no affiliations available

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