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Die Gewebekultur in der Tuberkuloseforschung unter besonderer Berücksichtigung immunbiologischer Fragen

  • Hildegard Schellenberg
Part of the Tuberkulose-Forschungsinstitut Borstel book series (TBC BORSTEL, volume 1956/57)

Zusammenfassung

Die Gewebekultur in der Tuberkuloseforschung ist bereits vor Jahrzehnten besonders zur Klärung immunbiologischer Fragen angewendet worden. Auch andere chronische bakterielle Infektionen, die wie die Tuberkulose mit intracellulärer Keimaufnahme verbunden sind, wurden mit Hilfe der Gewebekultur studiert.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1957

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  • Hildegard Schellenberg

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