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Ethylchloride: A Viable Alternative for Medium and High-Temperature Compression Heat Pump Cycles

  • M. Narodoslawsky
  • J. Fresner
  • K. Bärnthaler
  • F. Moser
  • J. Röhler
Conference paper

Abstract

Worries about global warming trends have brought back interest in energy saving techniques and with that in heat pumps. However, with ozone depletion also very much in the minds of decision makers in industry and politics, compression cycles operated with fully halogenated compounds have a serious drawback in the competition for energy saving technologies.

From thorough thermodynamic and toxicologic screening of about 940 substances widely used in chemical engineering, ethylchloride emerged as a potential replacement for R114 in compression cycles. Major advantages of this of this substance include low (and known!) toxicity, compatibility with oils and materials of construction and both, better performance parameters and wider field of application than R114. Given the high contend of hydrogen in the molecule, atmospheric lifetime of ethylchloride is low and hence low or zero ozone depletion and greenhouse effect are expected.

First results in an experimental test rig, corroborating the theoretical findings, will be presented as well as results of material compatibility tests. In these tests, ethylchloride shows high potential for posing a viable alternative for medium and high temperature applications of compression heat pump cycles.

Keywords

Heat Pump Volumetric Heat Capacity Compression Cycle Atmospheric Lifetime Global Warming Trend 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Narodoslawsky
    • 1
  • J. Fresner
    • 1
  • K. Bärnthaler
    • 1
  • F. Moser
    • 1
  • J. Röhler
    • 2
  1. 1.Graz University of TechnologyAustria
  2. 2.Shell PAE LaboratoryHamburgGermany

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