Damping mechanisms and phenomenology in materials

  • B. J. Lazan

Abstract

Definition of damping. Sensitive Theological measurements reveal that perfect elasticity is almost never observed in materials and structures even at low stress. Under cyclic loading inelasticity leads to a stress-strain relation that is not a single-valued function but instead forms a hysteretic loop (see Fig. 1 and Table 1). The area within the loop is proportional to the energy dissipated per cycle of loading, a property identified by the term “damping” or “internal friction” in this paper. This definition of damping specifically excludes energy transfer devices such as dynamic absorbers or so-called dynamic “dampers”; energy must be absorbed within the specified system before the term damping is applicable.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. J. Lazan
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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