Temperature Measurements in the Bottom Layers of the Red Sea Brines

  • David T. Pugh

Abstract

Detailed measurements of temperatures in the water layers immediately above the sediments in Atlantis II and Discovery Deeps are presented. In the bottom 60m of Discovery Deep there is a cooling of 0.5°C as the sediment is approached; above 60m the temperature gradient is adiabatic except for a discrete temperature change at 80m. The water column at the bottom in Atlantis II Deep is stable. These results suggest periodic outflow of hot saline water from Atlantis II Deep into Discovery Deep.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • David T. Pugh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Geodesy & GeophysicsCambridgeEngland

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