Hospital Information Systems

  • Bruce I. Blum

Abstract

This is the first of four chapters that describe clinical information systems (CIS). In Chapter 2 medical systems were organized by the objects they processed:
  • Data. The uninterpreted items

  • Information. Interpreted sets of data

  • Knowledge. The rules, relationships, experience, etc. by which data become information.

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References

For Further Reading

  1. The book of readings Information Systems for Patient Care (BI Blum, ed, Springer-Verlag, 1984) has 10 papers dealing with the HIS. There are surveys, descriptions of PCS, HELP and PROMIS, and chapters on planning and installation of an HIS. Drazen’s evaluation paper is also included.Google Scholar
  2. Other sources of information include DAB Lindberg, The Growth of Medical Information Systems in the United States, Lexington Books, 1979, as well as some of the references cited in Chapter 2.Google Scholar
  3. Finally, although somewhat out of date, MF Collen (ed), Hospital Computer Systems, John Wiley, 1974, contains much useful material. Of particular interest is RH Richart’s chapter on evaluation.Google Scholar
  4. For persons interested in specific systems, the American Hospital Association has a Hospital Technology Series that describes systems. The nonprofit organization, Medsy, also produces comparative systems reports. Two Federal Government activities provide additional sources of information. The Department of Defense has a TRIMIS program. Because most of their systems are procured, there is a good deal of useful requirements and evaluation literature now in the public domain. The Veterans Administration is also implementing some HIS components using MUMPS; these systems also should be in the public domain when completed.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Jydstrup, R. A. and M. J. Gross, Cost of Information Handling in Hospitals, Health Services Research, Winter, 1966, pp 235–271.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Jydstrup, R. A. and M. J. Gross, Cost of Information Handling in Hospitals, Health Services Research, Winter, 1966, p 260.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Johns, R. J. and B.I. Blum, The Use of Clinical Information Systems to Control Costs as Well as to Improve Care, Trans. Am. Clinical and Climatological Assn, 90, 1973, pp 140–152.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Lindberg, D. A.B., The Growth of Medical Information Systems in the United States, Lexington Books, 1979, p 10.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Patient Care Systems Terminal Operators Guide, IBM manual SH2000–1956–0, 1977, pp 41–43.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Warner, E., Expert System Helps Guide Hospital’s Physicians Through Life and Death Decisions, Computerworld, July 9, 1984, pp 18–19.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Stratmann, W. E., A Demonstration of PROMIS, DHEW (PHS) 79–3247, September 1974, pp 7–8.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Demonstration and Evaluation of a Total Hospital Information System, DHEW (HRA) 77–3188, July 1977, p 32.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Drazen, E. and J. Metzger, Methods for Evaluating Costs of Automated Hospital Information Systems, DHHS (PHS) 81–3283, July 1981, p 37.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Coffey, R. M., How a Medical Information System Affects Hospital Costs: the El Camino Hospital Experience, DHEW (PHS) 80–3255, March 1980, Abstract.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Gall, J. E., Jr. Computerized Hospital Information Systems Cost Effectiveness—A Cast Study, J. van Egmond, P. F. deVries Robbe and A. H. Levy (eds), Information Systems for Patient Care: Review, Analysis and Evaluation, North-Holland, 1976, p 286.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce I. Blum
    • 1
  1. 1.Applied Physics LaboratoryThe Johns Hopkins UniversityLaurelUSA

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