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Giardia muris Infection, Intestine, Mouse, Rat, and Hamster

  • Stephen W. Barthold
Part of the Monographs on Pathology of Laboratory Animals book series (LABORATORY, volume 3)

Abstract

Although mice infected with Giardia are usually asymptomatic, impairment of weight gain is the most common sign of infection. Severely affected mice are lethargic and have rough hair coats, distended abdomens, and malodorous diarrhea or soft feces. Increased mortality among weanling mice can occur. Gross lesions include a dilated small intestine containing watery fluid and gas. Pancreatic edema, ascites, and mesenteric lym-phadenopathy have been described (Boorman et al. 1973; Csiza and Abelseth 1973; Roberts-Thomson et al. 1976a; Sebesteny 1969). As in mice, infections in rats and hamsters are usually asymptomatic, but clinical signs and lesions can occur. Aged hamsters with giardiasis may have chronic diarrhea and weight loss, with thickening of the bowel wall, particularly the cecum.

Synonym

Lamblia muris infection 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

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  • Stephen W. Barthold

There are no affiliations available

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