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Respiration as a Limiting Factor for Working Capacity

  • Gunnar Grimby
Part of the Verhandlungen der Gesellschaft für Lungen- und Atmungsforschung book series (VGLA)

Abstract

Diseases of the cardiorespiratory system often considerably limit the physical work performance. However, to what extent is the respiratory system a limiting factor for exercise tolerance without manifest respiratory disease? What factors should be taken into consideration?

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gunnar Grimby
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Rehabilitation Medicine ISahlgren’ s HospitalGöteborgSweden

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