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Sodium-dependent Metabolism and Transport of γ-Aminobutyric Acid in Subcellular Particles from Brain

  • S. Varon
  • H. Weinstein
  • E. Roberts

Abstract

The properties of γ-aminobutyric acid (γABA) are of great interest in the biochemistry and physiology of the vertebrate central nervous system [1]. γABA is found to associate with mitochondria, microsomes and nerve ending particles, all of which can be sedimented from mouse brain homogenates in 0.25 M sucrose by centrifugation between 1,500 and 15,000 × g. When a pellet is resuspended in 0.2 M NaCl (buffered at pH 7.3) and incubated at 0–4° C in the presence of 2-14C-γABA, a rapid accumulation of radioactivity in the particle occurs. This accumulation is dependent on the presence of Na+ ions. A series of studies, reviewed in the preceding paper [2], has led to the postulation of an equilibrating carrier mechanism for the uptake of γABA at 0°C. The Na-dependence of this mechanism lies in a Na+ ion requirement for the carrier to bind γABA.

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References

  1. [1]
    Roberts, E. (ed.), 1960: “Inhibition of the Nervous System and y-Aminobutyric Acid.” Pergamon Press, New York.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Weinstein, H., S. Varon, and E. Roberts, 1965: These Proceedings, p.318.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Varon, S., H. Weinstein, C. F. Baxter, and E. Robertsy 1965: Biochem. Pharmacol. 14, 1755.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Varon, S., H. Weinstein, and E. Robert: (in preparation).Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    Salganicaff, L., and E. DeRobertis, 1963: Life Sciences 2, 85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Varon
    • 1
  • H. Weinstein
    • 1
  • E. Roberts
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryCity of Hope Medical CenterDuarteUSA

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