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Nucleic Acids

  • Jaurès Jordanov
  • Luigi Zanotti
  • Giovanni Prenna
  • Luigi Zanotti
  • P. van Duijn
  • C. G. Struyk
  • Z. Lodin
  • J. Pilný
  • J. Gregor
  • Günter Kiefer
  • Walter Sandritter
  • Dick Killander
  • Nils R. Ringertz
  • Rudolf RiglerJr.
  • Nirmal K. Das
  • Peter Luykx
  • Max Alfert
  • A. A. Zotikov
  • V. G. Kondratenko

Abstract

The effect of the acid hydrolysis on nuclear chromatin in histological sections of mouse spleen and liver and in smears of rat thymus was investigated by means of Feulgen reaction (FR) and some staining methods. The data of a number of authors for the loss of Feulgen-positive material (apurinic acid) during a prolonged hydrolysis with n HC1 at 60° C were confirmed. It was established that the high temperature of the hydrolyzing solution and not the acid itself was responsible for the removal of the apurinic acid from sections. In this respect warm water at 60° C exhibits the same effect on apurinic acid as n 1101 at 60° C. The standard 8 to 12 minutes’ hydrolysis with nHCl at 60° C causes a transition from only a part of DNA to apurinic acid capable to give FR. This fact besides the possibility of a partial removal of apurinic acid from the sections for the same time makes the standard hydrolysis inconvenient for quantitative cytophotometric studies. Hydrolysis with 5nHC1 at room temperature carried out on sections fixed in formol-containing fluids (Serra, 10 per cent neutral formol, formol-acetic acid) achieves for about 35 minutes a complete converting of DNA into apurinic acid and fails to remove the latter for hours from the sections. Therefore such a hydrolysis procedure seems to be much more convenient for cytophotometric application of FR.

Nucleinsäuren

Acides nucléiques

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaurès Jordanov
    • 1
  • Luigi Zanotti
    • 2
  • Giovanni Prenna
    • 2
  • Luigi Zanotti
    • 2
  • P. van Duijn
    • 3
  • C. G. Struyk
    • 3
  • Z. Lodin
    • 4
  • J. Pilný
    • 4
  • J. Gregor
    • 4
  • Günter Kiefer
    • 5
  • Walter Sandritter
    • 5
  • Dick Killander
    • 6
  • Nils R. Ringertz
    • 6
  • Rudolf RiglerJr.
    • 7
  • Nirmal K. Das
    • 8
  • Peter Luykx
    • 8
  • Max Alfert
    • 8
  • A. A. Zotikov
    • 9
  • V. G. Kondratenko
    • 9
  1. 1.Inst. of Morphology at the Bulgarian Academy of SciencesSofiaBulgaria
  2. 2.Institute of Comparative Anatomy and Center of Histochemistry of C.N.R.University of PaviaItaly
  3. 3.Laboratory for Pathology, Biochemical SectionUniversity of LeidenThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Laboratory of Cytophysiology and Cytochemistry of the Nervous Cell, Institute of PhysiologyCzechoslovak Academy of Sciences, and High Technical School, Faculty of MathematicsPrague 6ČSSR
  5. 5.Pathologisches Institut der Justus Liebig-Universität63 GiessenDeutschland
  6. 6.Dept. for Cell ResearchKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  7. 7.Institute for Cell Research and GeneticsKarolinska InstitutetStockholm 60Sweden
  8. 8.Dept. of ZoologyUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  9. 9.Institute of Radiation and Physico-Chemical BiologyAcademy of Sciences of the USSRMoscowUSSR

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