Blood, Bone

  • Gabriel Kelenyi
  • Elisabeth Zombai
  • Bohdan J. Koszewski
  • G. L. Castoldi
  • H. Merker
  • M. Wachstein
  • J. Ortiz
  • C. Fernandez
  • Chr. Goulis
  • A. Kovatsis
  • Erhard Ambs
  • Gunter F. Bahr
  • Elmar Zeitler
  • Hans E. Müller
  • K. Hübner
  • H. G. Schiemer
  • Leonard F. Bélanger
  • Harold M. Fullmer
  • Clifton LinkJr.

Abstract

The granules of the eosinophil leukocytes of the rat give an intense benzidine-peroxidase reaction. Pretreatment with phosphotungstic or phosphomolybdic acid partly inhibits the reaction: instead of the end product of the reaction, i.e., “benzidine-brown”, a quinonediimine-derivative, the granules appear in bluish-grey colour, suggesting that in intermediary product, “benzidin-blue” is formed. — Electronmicroscopical observations show that both benzidine-peroxidase activity and phosphotungstic acid staining are localized to the outer part of the granules, the externum. The enzyme myeloperoxidase with its high isoelectric point (pH 10–11) is responsible for the peroxidase reaction and may be the cause of the phosphotungstic acid staining of the granules. The partial inhibition of the reaction in the pretreated granules is probably connected with local acidic medium produced by the free radicals of phosphotungstic acid. These stabilize the benzidine-peroxidase reaction in the stage of “benzidine-blue”, a phenomenon which may be observed light microscopically during benzidine-peroxidase reaction, when the medium is acidified.

Blut, Knochen

Sang, Os

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabriel Kelenyi
    • 1
  • Elisabeth Zombai
    • 1
  • Bohdan J. Koszewski
    • 2
  • G. L. Castoldi
    • 3
  • H. Merker
    • 3
  • M. Wachstein
    • 4
    • 5
  • J. Ortiz
    • 4
    • 5
  • C. Fernandez
    • 4
    • 5
  • Chr. Goulis
    • 6
  • A. Kovatsis
    • 6
  • Erhard Ambs
    • 7
    • 8
  • Gunter F. Bahr
    • 7
    • 8
  • Elmar Zeitler
    • 7
    • 8
  • Hans E. Müller
    • 9
  • K. Hübner
    • 10
  • H. G. Schiemer
    • 10
  • Leonard F. Bélanger
    • 11
  • Harold M. Fullmer
    • 12
  • Clifton LinkJr.
    • 12
  1. 1.Dept. of PathologyUniversity of PécsPécsHungary
  2. 2.Hematology Research LaboratorySt. Joseph’s Hospital and Creighton University School of MedicineOmahaUSA
  3. 3.Medizinische Universitätsklinik78 Freiburg i. Br.Deutschland
  4. 4.Dept. of PathologySt. Catherine’s HospitalBrooklynUSA
  5. 5.Beth Israel HospitalPassaicUSA
  6. 6.Clinique d’Obstétrique et de GynécologieAristoteles Université de ThessalonikiSalonikiGreece
  7. 7.University of Würzburg87 WürzburgGermany
  8. 8.Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Washington, D.C.USA
  9. 9.I. Med. Klinik und Poliklinik der Universität65 MainzDeutschland
  10. 10.Pathologisches Institut der Universität6 Frankfurt a. M.Deutschland
  11. 11.Dept. of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of OttawaCanada
  12. 12.Dept. of Health, Education and WelfareNational Institute of Dental Research, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Public Health ServiceBethesda 14USA

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