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Hemorrhagic and post-hemorrhagic shock

  • J. M. Howard

Abstract

Clinical surgery has provided an almost unlimited experience in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock in man. In spite of this opportunity, the number of careful clinical studies in man is distressingly small. Studies in man have almost been limited to World War I, World War II, and the Korean War and to a very few very careful civilian studies such as that led by Cournand and Gregerson during World War II. Nevertheless, progress has been outstanding Transfusion has solved the major problems in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock in the younger patient. Most of the problems at present, numerically speaking, exist in the older group of patients who obviously tolerate blood loss less efficiently than do their younger counterparts. Progress being made in the freeze-storage of blood and in understanding plasma reactions will further solidify progress in transfusion.

Keywords

Blood Volume Hemorrhagic Shock Total Blood Volume Refractory Shock Acute Blood Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1962

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Howard

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