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Clinical and Preclinical Studies with Low-Clearance Liposomal Amikacin (MiKasome®)

  • Robert M. Fielding
  • Geoffrey Mukwaya
  • Robert A. Sandhaus
Part of the Biotechnology Intelligence Unit book series (BIOIU)

Abstract

The introduction of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the mid-twentieth century led to dramatic changes in the treatment of tuberculosis followed by improved therapy of the emerging problem of Gram-negative bacterial infections. Clinical experience soon revealed that although the aminoglycosides possess a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity, they may also produce serious, dose-related damage to the kidneys and the auditory/vestibular apparatus. As a result, aminoglycosides require therapeutic drug monitoring to maintain their plasma concentrations within a narrow therapeutic window, and aminoglycosides are now often reserved for the most severe infections despite their excellent antimicrobial properties.

Keywords

Klebsiella Pneumoniae Urinary Recovery Mononuclear Phagocyte System Multilamellar Liposome Plasma Ultrafiltrate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Fielding
  • Geoffrey Mukwaya
  • Robert A. Sandhaus

There are no affiliations available

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