Emission of Electrons and X-Ray Quanta

  • Ludwig Reimer
Part of the Springer Series in Optical Sciences book series (SSOS, volume 45)

Abstract

Backscattered electrons (BSE) and secondary electrons (SE) are the most important signals for image recording. A knowledge of the dependence of the backscattering coefficient η and the secondary electron yield δ on surface tilt, material and electron energy and their angular and energy distributions is essential for the interpretation of image contrast (Chap. 6). The spatial exit distributions and information depths of these electrons are responsible for the resolution if the latter is not limited by the electron-probe size. The shot noise of the incident electron current will be increased during SE and BSE emission.

Keywords

Attenuation Cage Refraction Fluorine Azimuth 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ludwig Reimer
    • 1
  1. 1.Physikalisches InstitutWestfätlische Wilhelms-Univeraität MünsterMünsterFed. Rep. of Germany

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