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Trees III pp 358-382 | Cite as

Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus L.)

  • D. T. Webb
  • B. S. Flinn
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 16)

Abstract

Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.), also known as Weymouth Pine, and Pin du Lord, was the dominant climax species in the great forests of eastern North America at the time of European exploration. The largest specimens in the virgin forests of the New World were over 70 m tall and had diameters greater than 3 m. Presently, P. strobus commonly attains a height of 30 m at maturity (Fig. 1) but on favorable sites it can reach over 50 m, with a diameter at breast height of 1.5 m (Syme 1985). In overall size it is second only to sugar pine (P. lambertiana).

Keywords

Somatic Embryogenesis Embryogenic Callus Shoot Formation Nitrate Reductase Activity Shoot Induction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. T. Webb
  • B. S. Flinn
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Paper Science and TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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