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Trees III pp 269-287 | Cite as

Eldarica Pine, Afghan Pine (Pinus eldarica Medw.)

  • G. C. Phillips
  • H. J. Gladfelter
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 16)

Abstract

Pinus eldarica Medw. (Fig. 1) is a fast-growing pine producing multiple products, one of the few pines adapted to grow in temperate semi-arid zones. It is known by the common names eldarica pine, Eldar pine, Quetta pine, and Afghanistan pine. Eldarica pine is the preferred name (Fisher et al. 1986). Taxonomically, it is closely related to P. halepensis Mill and P. brutia Ten. Some classifications refer to eldarica pine as a separate species (see Fisher et al. 1986) while others consider it to be a subspecies of P. brutia (Panetos 1981). This complex is often referred to as the Pinus halepensis/brutia group pines, classified taxonomically to the subgenus Pinus, section Pinus, subsection Sylvestres (Critchfield and Little 1966).

Keywords

Somatic Embryo Somatic Embryogenesis Shoot Organogenesis Apical Organization Christmas Tree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. C. Phillips
  • H. J. Gladfelter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Agronomy and Horticulture, Plant Genetic Engineering LaboratoryNew Mexico State UniversityLas CrucesUSA

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