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Trees III pp 241-253 | Cite as

Jack Pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.)

  • E. E. Chesick
  • B. A. Bergmann
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 16)

Abstract

Jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) (Fig. 1), an economically important timber species in northern North America, is used for pulp, poles, and lumber. The species ranks first among conifers for pulpwood production in the Great Lake States of the United States of America and second only to black spruce [Picea mariana (Mill) P.B.S.] in volume harvested in Canada (Reimenschneider 1982; Moore 1984; Yeatman 1984). It is drought-resistant, extremely shade intolerant, and grows on a wide variety of sites. Performance is best on sandy loam or clay loam soils (Moore 1984). On dry, sandy, low-fertility sites where few other tree species will grow, it can be considered a climax species (Benzie 1977). Early growth is rapid and in the Great Lake States on good sites with short rotations it can produce as much pulpwood by weight as red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) (Reimenschneider 1982; Rudolph and Yeatman 1982).

Keywords

Great Lake Embryo Culture Shoot Elongation Cytoplasmic Streaming Pinus Banksiana 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. E. Chesick
    • 1
  • B. A. Bergmann
    • 2
  1. 1.Forest Science LaboratoryWestvaco CorporationSummervilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of ForestryNorth Carolina State UniversityBiltmore Hall, RaleighUSA

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