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Principles of Isolation, Cultivation, and Conservation of Bacteria

  • Heinz Stolp
  • Mortimer P. Starr

Abstract

The main topics of this Handbook are habitats, isolation, and identification of the prokaryotes. Isolation of bacteria in axenic culture is and has been a cornerstone of bacteriology. There can be no question whatsoever but that the invention of procedures for securing and maintaining axenic microbial cultures surely must be ranked as one of the major achievements of civilization. But, in retrospect, one might lament having the axenic culture as the sole approach during the past century to “proper” study of bacteria. At a number of points in this Handbook, tantalizing glimpses appear of highly interesting bacteriology performed without axenic cultures. Mixed cultures—either synthetic mixtures of pure cultures or natural populations—are only now beginning to be legitimate objects for deliberate study by bacteriologists; they have already provided fresh views about organismic interactions and interrelationships.

Keywords

Lactic Acid Bacterium Pure Culture Anaerobic Bacterium Enrichment Culture Aerobic Bacterium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heinz Stolp
  • Mortimer P. Starr

There are no affiliations available

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