Peaceful Change but not yet Stable Peace: Military Developments in the Baltic Sea Region, 1990–2000

  • Frank Möller
Chapter

Abstract

During the Cold War, the Baltic Sea region was a ‘strategic backwater’ (Council on Foreign Relations 1999) which received little attention in international politics. Like the European far North, the degree of tensions in the region reflected primarily the overall degree of tensions between the military blocs rather than conflicts emanating from the region itself. Unlike the far North, the issue was not primarily one of piling up and deterring one another by means of nuclear weapons. Regional security dynamics were suppressed by all-European and global dynamics reflecting the superpower antagonism. Swedish and Finnish neutrality, however, cushioned the manifestation of the superpower rivalry in the region to some extent.

Keywords

Porosity Europe Radar Dition Tral 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

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  • Frank Möller

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