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The Parallel Fibers

  • John C. Eccles
  • Masao Ito
  • János Szentágothai

Abstract

Before attempting to develop ideas on the mode of operation of neuronal circuits in the cerebellar cortex, it is necessary to attempt to understand both the structural-functional correlations of component elements and the mode of operation of the synapses between these elements. In this way we will derive simple levels of understanding which can be assembled together, rather as in a jig-saw puzzle, to form more integrated levels of understanding. It is convenient to begin this structure-functional correlation in this Chapter with the parallel fibers, then with the inter-neurones of the cerebellar cortex (Chapter IV) and the Purkinje cells (Chapter V).

Keywords

Purkinje Cell Dendritic Spine Molecular Layer Cerebellar Cortex Synaptic Contact 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • John C. Eccles
    • 1
  • Masao Ito
    • 2
  • János Szentágothai
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Biomedical ResearchAmerican Medical Association, Education and Research FoundationChicagoUSA
  2. 2.University of TokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Anatomy University Medical SchoolBudapest, IX.Hungary

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