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Organizational Identity — A Psychoanalytic Exploration of Organizational Meaning

  • Michael A. Diamond
Part of the Contributions to Management Science book series (MANAGEMENT SC.)

Abstract

Organizational studies are undergoing change. Organization theory and research are moving toward greater sensitivity to subjective perceptions of the world, as illustrated by the current focus on “organizational culture.” (1) This development shifts the analysis of organizations from the study of empirical “objective” data to “intersubjective” data. Scholars want to know what organizational members experience and how that experience influences their decisions and actions. Contemporary organizational research is, therefore, composed less of “factual” statements from detached observers about administrative behavior and more of statements from participants themselves.

Keywords

Organizational Member Critical Incident Organizational Identity Transference Phenomenon Organizational Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael A. Diamond

There are no affiliations available

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