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Neuron-Specific Enolase, Protein S-100, Neurofilaments, Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Vimentin as Markers for Cytodifferentiation in Neuroblastoma

  • D. Schmidt
  • W. Keil
  • D. Harms

Abstract

Sixty cases of neuroblastoma including 20 cases each of undifferentiated (grade III), partially differentiated (grade II) and well-differentiated neuroblastoma (grade I, ganglioneu-roblastoma) were studied by means of immunohistochemistry. There were 33 males and 27 females with a mean age of 3.5 years. All tumors stained positively for neuron-specific enolase (NSE). Positive staining for protein S-100 was obtained in five cases of grade III, nine cases of grade II, and 15 cases of grade I tumors. Neurofilament protein and glialfibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were only found in ganglioneuroblastomas. Surprisingly, seven cases of grade II and 14 cases of grade I neuroblastomas stained positively for vimentin in the stromal portion. Single incompletely differentiated neuroblasts were also positive. It is concluded from the current study that among the various immunohisto-chemical methods applied neuroblastoma can be diagnosed with the greatest degree of certainty on the basis of immunostaining for NSE. Moreover, positive staining for protein S-100 and vimentin demonstrates the capacity of these tumors to differentiate into Schwann cells. Expression of GFAP is apparently not restricted to astrocytes and ependymal cells.

Keywords

Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Schwann Cell Pathol Anat Small Round Cell Tumor Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Antibody 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Schmidt
  • W. Keil
  • D. Harms

There are no affiliations available

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