Commercially available flexible assembly cell

  • A. M. Williams
  • B. H. Lill
Conference paper

Abstract

Presently, many robotic assembly applications are configured by systems integrators who use, where possible, standard devices and components. This makes it difficult to achieve an economically justifiable selling price. This paper describes the development of an integrated assembly cell, intended to provide 90–95% of the hardware and software requirements for the assembly of many different products, within certain size and mass limitations: the cell is intended for the low to medium product volume range and may be programmed to allow selective scheduling of product batches. The paper describes the derivation of cost requirements, and how the concept of the integrated cell evolved and was finally specified.

Keywords

Payback 

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References

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    Nevins, J.L and Whitney, D.E. “Computer Controlled Assembly”. Scientific American, (February 1978).Google Scholar
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    Williams, A.M. et al. “A Flexible Assembly Cell”. Proc. 6th ICAA, Birmingham, UK, (May 1985).Google Scholar
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    Kondoleon, A.S. “Assembly task statistics”. 3rd Annual Seminar on Advanced Assembly Automation. Charles Stark Draper Labs, Boston, Mass, (Nov 1982).Google Scholar
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    Ashton, M. et al. “A Flexible Assembly System Controller”. Proc. MACON 2, Birmingham, UK, (May 1987).Google Scholar
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    Redford, A.H. and Crossley, T.R. “Low cost general purpose assembly”. Research proposal to ACME Directorate of SERC, (Jan 1982).Google Scholar
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    SERC collaborations with: Salford UniversityBrunel University Oxford University (not yet started).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. M. Williams
    • 1
  • B. H. Lill
    • 1
  1. 1.Thorn EMI Central Research LaboratoriesUK

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