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Extraction and Analysis of Free and Protein-Bound Amino Acids from Norway Spruce Foliage

  • J. Lunderstädt
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

Amino acids are basic constituents of all living things; they are the building blocks of proteins and are intermediates in metabolism. A forest geneticist will look at amino acid quality (types present) and quantity (amount) for a variety of reasons. Variation in the quality of amino acids may serve as gene markers, for clone identification, and as a means of measuring population dynamics. In addition, amino acids are one of the nutrients present in trees that can be used by tree pests and thus they have implications in breeding for insect and disease resistant varieties of trees.

Keywords

Standard Amino Acid Rubber Glove Soluble Amino Acid Disease Resistant Variety Amino Acid Fraction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Lunderstädt

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