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Optical Techniques for Measuring DNA Quantity

  • G. P. Berlyn
  • R. A. Cecich
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

Not long ago Feulgen microspectrophotometry was considered to be such an advanced technique that it belonged only in the hands of specialists in microscopy. This situation has changed dramatically in the past few years because more and more scientists have come to appreciate the vast potential of the technique. This realization created a demand for commercial instruments, whereas previously, the microscopist of modest means had to assemble and, in some cases, construct his own instrument. Fully functional instruments are now commercially available over a wide price range and many of these are capable of providing accurate and precise data in the hands of most research scientists.

Keywords

Clear Area Optical Path Difference Basic Fuchsin Sodium Metabisulfite Feulgen Reaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. P. Berlyn
  • R. A. Cecich

There are no affiliations available

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