The Effect of CAPD on Lipid Abnormalities Detected by Apoproteins and Ultracentrifugal Lipid Subfractions

  • K. Ozawa
  • K. Goto
  • Y. Kijima
  • I. Nakayama
  • T. Shoji
  • T. Sasaoka
  • T. Akiba
  • S. Nakagawa

Summary

The hyperlipidemic tendency of CAPD patients (CAPD) has been described elsewhere without detailed data on apoproteins and ultracentrifugal lipid subfractions. In order to understand the details of hyperlipidemia, especially in light of the protective role of apoproteins, we compared the total cholesterol (TC), free cholesterol (FC), phospholipid (PL), triglyceride (TG), their ultracentrifugal subfractions, and apoproteins A-I, A-II, C-II, and E present in the uremic serum of CAPD with those in hemodialysis patients (HD) and in healthy normal controls (N).

TC, FC, PL, and TG were elevated in CAPD, whereas only the elevation of TG was noted in HD. Hypercholesterolemia was due to an increase in the VLDL and LDL fractions. HDL cholesterol, and especially HDL2 cholesterol, in CAPD were significantly lower than in N. Apo A-I and A-IC were within normal limits in CAPD. Apo C-II and E levels were higher in CAPD than in N. Accordingly, the HDL cholesterol/apo A-I ratio was lower in CAPD than in N. But the VLDL-TG/apo C-II ratio was higher in CAPD than in N.

It is suggested that apoproteins do not perform their protective role against atherogenesis in CAPD.

Keywords

Cholesterol Lipase Tuberculosis Fractionation Triglyceride 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Ozawa
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Goto
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y. Kijima
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. Nakayama
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Shoji
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Sasaoka
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Akiba
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Nakagawa
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Dialysis Unit, Department of MedicineYokosuka Kyosai HospitalYokosuka, KanagawaJapan
  2. 2.Department of MedicineTokyo Medical and Dental UniversityTokyoJapan

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