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Wheat pp 549-578 | Cite as

Mutations in Wheat — Future Possibilities

  • K. A. Siddiqui
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 13)

Abstract

In the agricultural context, wheat is the most important species in the tribe Triticeae. The tribe represents mutational events which have survived the repeated screening by natural selection. In the past, mutations in conjuction with hybridization and polyploidization have played a vital role in the evolution of wheat. At present, induced mutations are being constantly utilized on the global level in improving the agricultural fitness of wheat (Table 1). For the future, the genetical, cytological, and biochemical versatility of wheat presents exciting and almost unlimited possibilities of inducing mutations for qualitative and quantitative traits (Siddiqui et al. 1989).

Keywords

Bread Wheat Leaf Rust Wheat Variety Stripe Rust Wheat Breeding 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. A. Siddiqui
    • 1
  1. 1.Atomic Energy Research CentreTando JamPakistan

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