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Wheat pp 425-434 | Cite as

A Direct-Generation System for Wheat Haploid Production

  • G. H. Liang
  • J. Qi
  • D. S. Hassawi
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 13)

Abstract

Traditionally, in vitro production of wheat haploids requires a two-step procedure: induction of pollen callus and plantlet regeneration. Sometimes, a third step is required to promote the initiation and growth of roots following shoot regeneration. To be a practical tool in breeding programs, anther culture technique must be simple, efficient, and reliable. Although much progress has been made in wheat anther culture, problems still remain. (1) It is difficult to maintain a constant supply of anthers. (2) The frequency of regeneration is low and appears to depend on genotype. (3) Some regenerated plants are albinos or aneuploids. (4) Techniques of chromosome doubling need improvement.

Keywords

Anther Culture Chromosome Doubling Haploid Plant Plantlet Formation Wheat Haploid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. H. Liang
  • J. Qi
  • D. S. Hassawi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AgronomyKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA

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