Transgenic Hyssopus officinalis (Hyssop)

  • K. Ishimaru
  • Y. Murakami
  • K. Shimomura
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 48)

Abstract

Hyssopus (hyssop, Labiatae) is a hardy perennial, a native of rocky places, screes, and dry banks from Europe to central Asia. It is also naturalized in parts of North America. The name Hyssopus comes from hyssopos, an old Greek name used for the plant by Dioscorides (Everett 1981).

Keywords

Biomass Arthritis HPLC Magnesium Agar 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Ishimaru
    • 1
  • Y. Murakami
    • 1
  • K. Shimomura
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Applied Biological Sciences, Faculty of AgricultureSaga UniversitySagaJapan
  2. 2.Tsukuba Medicinal Plant Research StationNational Institute of Health SciencesIbarakiJapan

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