New Planetary Systems

  • Thérèse Encrenaz
  • Jean-Pierre Bibring
  • Michel Blanc
  • Maria-Antonietta Barucci
  • Francoise Roques
  • Philippe Zarka
Part of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Library book series (AAL)

Abstract

‘An infinite number of Suns exist, an infinite number of Earths orbit around these suns as the seven planets orbit our Sun. Living beings inhabit these worlds.’ Four centuries ago, this was Giordano Bruno’s brilliant intuition. Nowadays, we know that the Sun is a star, and that an extremely large number of stars in the Galaxy are accompanied by planets. Our knowledge is, however, still too fragmentary to know whether conditions for the appearance of life exist, or have existed, on extrasolar planets.

Keywords

Methane Migration Dust Chlorophyll Silicate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thérèse Encrenaz
    • 1
  • Jean-Pierre Bibring
    • 2
  • Michel Blanc
    • 3
  • Maria-Antonietta Barucci
    • 4
  • Francoise Roques
    • 4
  • Philippe Zarka
    • 4
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Recherche SpatialeObservatoire de ParisMeudonFrance
  2. 2.Laboratoire René BernasUniversité Paris XIOrsayFrance
  3. 3.Observatoire Midi-PyrenéesToulouseFrance
  4. 4.LESIAObservatoire de ParisMeudonFrance

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