Clinically Promising New Triazoles for Systemic Fungal Infections

  • M. N. Neely
  • D. J. Sheehan
  • M. A. Ghannoum
Part of the The Mycota book series (MYCOTA, volume 12)

Abstract

In the United States, Candida species are now the fourth most common nosocomial blood stream pathogen (8%) with the highest associated crude mortality of 40% (Edmond et al. 1999). In Europe, Candida spp. are the eighth most common cause (2.8%) of blood-stream infections, whether nosocomial or community-acquired (Fluit et al. 2000). Unfortunately, our ability to treat such infections remains poor. The mainstay of antifungal therapy, amphotericin B, was introduced for clinical use in the late 1950s, nearly 30 years after the isolation of penicillin. In contrast to antibacterial therapy, multiple antifungal drugs, susceptibility testing, and breakpoint determinations are only recently available. Traditionally, the field of medical mycology has been sparsely staffed, with pharmacological research and development hampered by the small numbers of patients with invasive, lifethreatening mycoses.

Keywords

Digoxin Tacrolimus Simvastatin Omeprazole Cyclodextrin 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. N. Neely
    • 1
  • D. J. Sheehan
    • 2
  • M. A. Ghannoum
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases and Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Rainbow Babies and Children’s HospitalUniversity Hospitals of ClevelandClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Pfizer Inc.Pfizer Pharmaceuticals GroupNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Dermatology, Center for Medical MycologyUniversity Hospitals of Cleveland and Case Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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