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Organolead Compounds

  • Friedo Huber
  • Wolfgang Petz
Part of the Gmelin Handbook of Inorganic and Organometallic Chemistry - 8th edition book series (GMELIN, volume P-b / 1-2 / 1)

Abstract

Tetraorganolead compounds were the first organoelement compounds to gain large-scale applied importance. This was a consequence of their high efficiency as antiknock agents in gasoline. This property subsequently induced an appreciable part of the rapid development in automotive techniques in the last fifty to sixty years; however, as a consequence of the extensive consumption of leaded gasoline the lead burden in the environment was also increased. Public concern and legislative measures were therefore enacted to reduce or prohibit the use of tetraalkyllead compounds as antiknock additives in gasoline.

Keywords

Lead Compound Lead Poisoning Organometallic Compound Mersey Estuary Lead Gasoline 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Patents Related to the Use as Antiknock Agents

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Patented Uses as Components of Polymerization Catalysts

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Friedo Huber
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Petz
    • 2
  1. 1.Universität DortmundGermany
  2. 2.Gmelin-InstitutFrankfurt am MainGermany

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