Mycorrhiza pp 593-605 | Cite as

Soil Acidity as a Constraint to the Application of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Technology

  • M. Habte

Abstract

Soils that have developed under humid temperate as well as humid tropical and subtropical climatic conditions are typically acid in their natural state with pH of 5 (in water) or less. Consequently, acid soil toxicity is a major variable determining biological activity in these soils. The deleterious effect of soil acidity on the activities of sensitive organisms may be caused by the direct effect of high concentrations of hydrogen ions in solution and/or the indirect effect of low pH on the solubility and hence toxicity of Al and Mn. Moreover, in such soils, nutrients such as Ca, Mg, Mo and P are often deficient or rendered less available.The aims of this chapter are (1) to summarize the state of knowledge regarding the influence of soil acidity on vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and (2) to propose some strategies which will contribute to a better understanding of the impacts of acid soil toxicity on the VAM symbiosis.

Keywords

Biomass Hydrolysis Toxicity Phosphorus Corn 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Habte
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Agronomy and Soil ScienceUniversity of Hawaii at ManoaHonoluluUSA

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