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Automated Prophylaxis of Postoperative and Posttraumatic Intracranial Hypertension

  • D. J. Price
  • J. Mason

Abstract

Any serious insult to the brain, whether the result of spontaneous haemorrhage, trauma or surgical manipulation may initiate a potentially preventable progressive process of secondary brain damage. The severity of such a secondary event is determined by its pathogenesis and the length of time it remains unrecognised and untreated. The aetiology of this continuing insult is the result of any combination of the three component factors of cerebral hypoxia, hypoperfusion and mechanical distortion. All three cause a reduction of delivery of oxygen to the vulnerable brain cells and distortion also produces localised compression of the neurones in addition to its influence on vessels.

Keywords

Head Injury Sodium Valproate Secondary Brain Damage Mannitol Administration Modern Neurosurgery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. Price
  • J. Mason

There are no affiliations available

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