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Zanthoxylum Species: In Vitro Culture, Aroma Emanation, and the Production of Secondary Metabolites

  • K. Imaizumi
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 43)

Abstract

The genus Zanthoxylum L. (Xanthoxylum L.) belongs to the family Rutaceae, and has about 200 species (Tsukamoto 1989). These species are deciduous or evergreen woody plants (shrubs or trees). The leaf type is alternate phyllotaxis and compound. The flower is very small, and white or greenish yellow. About 15 species are distributed in the temperate regions of East Asia and North America. These species are dioecious plants and have thorns on their branches. The main medicinal species are Z. ailanthoides Seib. et Zucc., Z. armatum DC., Z. nitidum (Roxb.) DC., and Z. piperitum DC.

Keywords

Parent Plant Root Bark Culture Line Aroma Component High Aroma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Imaizumi
    • 1
  1. 1.Botanical InstitutePL Gakuen Women’s Junior CollegeOsakaJapan

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