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Occupational Phototoxicity and Photoallergy

  • V. DeLeo

Abstract

Chemical photosensitivity is a term that is used to describe skin disease caused by the interaction of light and an exogenously acquired chemical agent. In all such reactions, both the chemical and radiation are necessary for the response to be produced. Exposure to the chemical photosensitizer can be either through the systemic or the topical route. The mechanism of the response can be either irritant (toxic) or allergic (Table 1). Chemical photosensitivity classified into four clinical entities: photoirritant contact dermatitis (PICD), photoallergic contact dermatitis (PACD), photoallergy to a systematic agent, and phototoxicity to a systematic agent.

Keywords

Contact Dermatitis Photo Allergen Minimal Erythema Dose Covered Site Photopatch Testing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

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  • V. DeLeo

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