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The Potential Use of Signature Bases from 16S rRNA Gene Sequences To Aid the Assignment of Microbial Strains to Genera of Halobacteria

  • Masahiro Kamekura
  • Toru Mizuki
  • Ron Usami
  • Yasuhiko Yoshida
  • Koki Horikoshi
  • Russell H. Vreeland
Chapter

Abstract

In the second edition of Bergey’s Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, Volume I, published in May 2001, the extremely halophilic, aerobic Archaea are classified within the domain Archaea, phylum AII Euryarchaeota, class III Halobacteria, order I Halobacteriales, family Halobacteriaceae. Currently, Halobacteriaceae comprises 17 valid genera (as of March 2003). The family is extraordinary in that it contains so many genera. In other families in the domain Archaea the highest number is the eight genera of the family Desulfurococcaceae. When the many unclassified halobacterial isolates are taken into consideration, it is clear that halobacterial diversity extends even further.

Keywords

rRNA Gene Sequence Signature Base rRNA Operon Halophilic Microorganism Syst Bacteriol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masahiro Kamekura
  • Toru Mizuki
  • Ron Usami
  • Yasuhiko Yoshida
  • Koki Horikoshi
  • Russell H. Vreeland

There are no affiliations available

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