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Molecular Approaches to Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Functioning

  • P. Franken
  • N. Requena
Part of the The Mycota book series (MYCOTA, volume 9)

Abstract

Fungi of the order Glomales (Zygomycota) form with the roots of most land plants a mutualistic symbiosis named arbuscular mycorrhiza (Newman and Reddell 1987; Morton and Benny 1990). Fossil and molecular data indicate that these organisms evolved about 400 Ma ago (Pirozynski and Dalpé 1989; Simon et al. 1993) and might have been an important factor for the colonisation process of the land by ancient plants (Pirozynski and Malloch 1975). Nowadays, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are worldwide distributed and a key component of most terrestrial ecosystems (Read et al. 1992). The symbiosis between the two biotrophic organisms is mainly characterised by bidirectional transfer of nutrients which gives access for the plant to low mobile elements like phosphorus (Smith and Gianinazzi-Pearson 1988).

Keywords

Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Mycorrhizal Fungus Root Exudate Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Differential Display Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Franken
    • 1
  • N. Requena
    • 1
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für terrestrische Mikrobiologie and Laboratorium für Mikrobiologie des Fachbereichs BiologiePhilipps-UniversitätMarburgGermany

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