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Water

  • H.-D. Belitz
  • W. Grosch
  • P. Schieberle

Abstract

Water (moisture) is the predominant constituent in many foods (Table 0.1). As a medium water supports chemical reactions, and it is a direct reactant in hydrolytic processes. Therefore, removal of water from food or binding it by increasing the concentration of common salt or sugar retards many reactions and inhibits the growth of microorganisms, thus improving the shelf lives of a number of foods. Through physical interaction with proteins, polysaccharides, lipids and salts, water contributes significantly to the texture of food.

Keywords

Water Activity Phase Transition Temperature Dimethyl Ether Hydration Shell Storage Life 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • H.-D. Belitz
    • 1
  • W. Grosch
    • 1
  • P. Schieberle
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für LebensmittelchemieTechnischen Universität MünchenGarchingGermany

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