Ethics and Nature in the World’s Religions

  • Harold Coward
Chapter
Part of the Wissenschaftsethik und Technikfolgenbeurteilung book series (ETHICSSCI, volume 19)

Abstract

Why is it important to include the world’s religions in our study of different perceptions and ethical approaches to the environment? For well over half the world’s population the traditional religions still construct the world view and perception filter that guides the way people interact with nature. As Uno Svedin (1995) put it, one’s world view with its cultural-religious connotations creates a frame for one’s thinking and ethical choices. Three additional reasons for including religions may be advanced. First, just as philosophy, law and economics may offer guidance based upon a long history of human thought, so also religion has been and remains a major part of human civilization; therefore, its wisdom should be considered. Second, since many in today’s world are believers of one religion or another, an appeal for individual environmental responsibility could use, as part of its argument at least, an appeal to the individual’s religious beliefs. Third, some states are religious rather than secular (e. g. Pakistan and Iran); therefore, knowledge of religious responsibility can help in appealing to such states for international co-operation on environmental problems such as global warming.

Keywords

Dioxide Lution Infertility Verse Ethos 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harold Coward

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